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                                SASKATCHEWAN COLLEGE




Academic Authorities Grid: In Policy A-1.1, the grid outlines the required level at which recommendation, endorsement, approval and notification occur for Saskatchewan Polytechnic programs. It ensures that new programs, changes to existing programs and courses, and program suspensions and deletions are subject to an approved, consistent and effective process.

Academic Probation
: Probation involves a set of restrictions, expectations, performance indicators, and timelines placed on a student whose academic progress in a program is unsatisfactory. For more information, refer to our Academic Progress policy.

Academic Year:
 The academic year at Saskatchewan Polytechnic is July 1 of one year to June 30 of the next year.

Advanced Certificate: Advanced certificates are short programs designed to build on post-secondary level education or lead to a higher degree of specialization in the same or related field. Program emphasis is placed on achieving advanced levels of learning outcomes.

Applicant - Qualified: Applicants who have met or conditionally met the admission requirements to a program. This category includes applicants who qualified for admission prior to the application being withdrawn.

Applicant - Unqualified: Applicants who have not met or conditionally met the admission requirements for a program. This category includes applicants who did not qualify for admission prior to the application being withdrawn.

Applicant - Qualification Unknown: Applicants who have not yet been assessed or for whom there are outstanding requirements or documents.










Applied Certificate: Applied certificates are short programs designed to provide introductory level skills training in a specific application of an occupation.

Base Programs: Base programs are administered by program heads and delivered on a regular basis, usually at a Saskatchewan Polytechnic campus. They may be core or cost-recovery funded.

Basic Education: Basic Education describes a range of educational opportunities that includes provincially-accredited Grade 10 (Adult 10) and Grade 12 (Adult 12) secondary programs, as well as a variety of literacy, language and transitional non-credit training options.

Billing Unit: An expression of the tuition rate for Saskatchewan Polytechnic programs and courses. Where credit units are applied to courses, one credit unit is equal to one billing unit. (See also Credit Unit.)
Campus: Saskatchewan Polytechnic has locations in four Saskatchewan cities: Moose Jaw, Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon.

Capacity: There are three measures of capacity in a Saskatchewan Polytechnic program:  a budgeted capacity, which reflects the projected number of students in a program for an academic year; intake capacity, which reflects the approved number of seats in a single intake of a program; and program capacity, which reflects the approved number of seats for all intakes and all years of a program, within a single academic year.










Certificate: Certificates are programs designed to provide skills training and education leading to entry level employment in a particular occupation. Certificate program learning outcomes are normally found at the basic knowledge and application level. These programs typically correspond to one year of study.

Clinical Experience (CLIN courses): A method of unpaid training that takes place in a clinical setting in the field of study in which students are orientated. Clinicals are taught, monitored and evaluated by Saskatchewan Polytechnic instructors or preceptors based on established learning outcomes. Fifteen hours of clinical experience is equal to one credit unit.

Students receive a pass or fail grade
Credits are awarded and clinical experiences are required to graduate
Tuition is assessed per credit unit and in accordance with current Tuition and Fees policy

Clinical (Preceptored): This method of training, offered as part of some home-study programs and courses, involves students working on a one-to-one basis with guidance from an experienced instructor (preceptor). Depending on the course or program, the preceptor is either a volunteer nurse or physician.This clinical experience may or may not be scheduled in or near the student's community. Students are not paid during the clinical and require time off from work.

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Co-operative Education Work Terms (COOP courses): A method of training that combines classroom learning with paid on-the-job work experience monitored by Saskatchewan Polytechnic faculty. To increase career growth potential, training alternates between academic semesters and co-op work terms. Co-op work terms are either mandatory or optional, depending on the program. (See also Work Experience).

Students receive a pass or fail grade
No credits are awarded but co-operative education is most often required to graduate (i.e., mandatory)
Each co-op work term is approximately four months long
Tuition is assessed at a flat rate and in accordance with current Tuition and Fees policy

Co-requisite Courses: Two or more courses that must be taken at the same time.

Contract Training: Programming that is delivered on a contractual basis, with government, business, industry or a funding organization, to address specific client-identified training needs.

Core Courses: Core courses are credit courses that are common to a number of Saskatchewan Polytechnic programs.

Core Funding: A method of funding that involves the provision of a government grant to deliver a Saskatchewan Polytechnic credit program (all courses must be credit courses). Saskatchewan Polytechnic programs are funded through either core or cost-recovery means, or through contracted delivery.

Cost-Recovery Funding: A method of funding that involves establishing a tuition that is intended to recover all administrative costs associated with the program. Saskatchewan Polytechnic programs are funded through either core or cost-recovery means, or through contracted delivery.

Course Code: A unique identifier that is attached to, and displayed with, each course. It is composed of a two-to-four character subject code and a two-to-four character course number.

Course Registrations: A student's registration in a course that is credit or non-credit.

Credential: A credential is awarded for successful completion of a credit program (i.e., certificate, applied certificate, advanced certificate, diploma). The successful student receives a parchment that specifies the credential received.

Credit Course: Planned training that has a defined set of learning outcomes and evaluation processes. Credit courses are/were part of applied certificate, certificate, diploma and advanced certificate programs, apprenticeship and licensure requirements.

Credit Program: A credit program is a Saskatchewan Polytechnic-approved occupation-specific education or training endeavour that includes evaluating, documenting and formally recording student achievement in the student's permanent record. Every credit program is endowed with a specific title, length, admission requirements, curriculum outline, credit courses, credit units, completion requirements and a completion document.











Credit Unit: An expression of course value whereby 15 training hours is equal to one credit unit. Some program requirements, such as Work Experience, do not have associated credit units. Where credit units are applied to courses, one credit unit is equal to one billing unit. (See also Billing Unit.)

Degree: Degrees are programs designed to provide advanced skills and knowledge at the baccalaureate level. In addition to the applied focus that is the hallmark of all Saskatchewan Polytechnic programs, degrees add higher level critical thinking/inquiry and problem solving skills as well as significant depth and breadth to the learning experience at a higher level than the diploma. Saskatchewan Polytechnic degree programs emphasize applied coursework and active learning, particularly at the upper level (years 3 and 4). Degrees will be a minimum of 120 credits.

Diploma: Diplomas are programs designed to provide comprehensive and advanced skills training and education leading to entry level employment in a particular occupation. The breadth and depth of training and education lead to the achievement of a higher level of learning and proficiency than a certificate. Graduates are able to apply knowledge, solve problems, undertake analysis, synthesis and evaluation in the area of practice, and they will have begun to explore processes of applied research and/or scholarship. Diploma programs typically correspond to two years of study. Programs with a cooperative education component will require additional time for completion.

Disability: A permanent or ongoing condition that might interfere with successful studies such as:

Attention deficit disorder
Hearing impairment
Intellectual disability
Learning disability
Psychiatric or  mental health disability
Physical/medical disability (including fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, brain injury and chronic health conditions)
Temporary disability
Visual impairment

Saskatchewan Polytechnic accepts the Human Rights definition of disability, refer to the Sask Human Rights Code, Section 2 (d.1) (pdf)


Discontinuation: A status that involves a student who voluntarily discontinues from the program by providing written notification of withdrawal to Registration Services. (See also Required to Discontinue and Withdrawal.)

Distance Education: Distance education denotes training that is delivered remotely, through home study, televised or online delivery.

Distinction/Great Distinction:
 Saskatchewan Polytechnic certificates and diplomas are issued With Distinction to students who achieve a cumulative grade average at graduation of 85 per cent to 89 per cent. Saskatchewan Polytechnic certificates and diplomas are issued With Great Distinction to students who achieve a cumulative grade average at graduation of 90 per cent to 100 per cent.

Enrolment: Enrolment represents the number of students registered in a Saskatchewan Polytechnic course or enrolled in a Saskatchewan Polytechnic program at a specified point in time.

Equity Status: There are four designated equity groups in Canada (defined in theEmployment Equity Act of Canada and the Federal Contractor's Program); therefore, Saskatchewan Polytechnic defines its equity applicants and students as women, persons with disabilities, members of visible minorities and Aboriginal persons. Individuals with equity status must self-declare in order for Saskatchewan Polytechnic to collect, act on and report this information.

Equivalent Course Credit:
 Saskatchewan Polytechnic may grant credit for a specific Saskatchewan Polytechnic course(s) on the basis of credit previously obtained through another Saskatchewan Polytechnic course(s). Equivalent course credit is not reciprocal unless it is specifically declared.

Expulsion: 
A student status that permanently excludes the student from Saskatchewan Polytechnic, and is executed under the authority of the Saskatchewan Polytechnic president. For more information, refer to our Student Conduct policy.

First Qualified/First Admitted:
 The First Qualified/First Admitted (FQFA) admission process is used for the majority of Saskatchewan Polytechnic programs. When Saskatchewan Polytechnic determines that students meet the program's admission requirements, they are offered admission based on the date they fully qualify for the program. The earlier students provide the required documents and information for admission to the next intake of the program, the earlier they might begin their studies. Applicants, once qualified, are always considered for the next intake.

Applicants to programs with multiple intakes in an academic year remain in the application pool until the last intake for that academic year has begun. Programs using the FQFA process receive applications year round and maintain an application pool for each academic year. Qualified applicants who are not offered a seat must reapply for the next academic year.

Sponsored programs or programs targeted to specific groups do not accept applications year round or maintain an application pool.









High-Demand Program: A program to which the high-demand admission method is applied. A program is designated high-demand when there are consistently more applicants than spaces available at each Saskatchewan Polytechnic location at which they are offered. High-demand programs have admission requirements plus additional selection criteria.

Home Study: This method of training allows students to progress through course materials independently. Materials include textbooks, videotapes and course manuals. In some cases, telephone access to course facilitators is provided (see also Independent Study). Students write exams for home study courses at testing sites in or near their communities. Home study may be complemented by laboratory, clinical or practicum requirements.

Independent Study: This method of training allows students to progress through course materials independently. Materials include textbooks, videotapes and course manuals. Access to an instructor is provided (see also Home Study). Students write exams for independent study courses at testing sites in or near their communities. Independent study may be complemented by laboratory, clinical or practicum requirements.

Industrial Attachment: This method of training involves full-time students who work in a selected industry for two weeks. Students are exposed to current industrial environments, and employers have the opportunity to assess prospective employees.

International Student:
 For reporting purposes, an international Saskatchewan Polytechnic student is a citizen of another country (who is not a Canadian citizen or a Canadian permanent resident) who is legally permitted to study in Canada, or who is taking Saskatchewan Polytechnic training in his home country.

Lab: A lab is a course or a component of a course that takes place at Saskatchewan Polytechnic or other specified laboratory facilities where students learn, practice and demonstrate psychomotor skills and other critical competencies.

Special Admission: 
A method of admission whereby students who do not possess the academic qualifications for a program are admitted if evidence of probable success is established through a special admission assessment. This assessment may involve testing or documented evidence of previous learning. The results of the assessment determine acceptance into programs or recommendations for preparatory training.

ACCUPLACER is used to test Math and English skills. Previous successful completion or partial completion of post-secondary certificates, diplomas and degrees from recognized institutions are used as indicators of student success. Where applicable, specific pre-requisite course requirements must be met in order to be admitted under special admission.

Special admission applicants are not admitted or placed on a wait list until they have provided complete documentation and demonstrated that all requirements have been met. An applicant may appeal a special admission decision to the dean of the division.

Special admission applies to most, but not all, programs.

Statement of Achievement: A statement of achievement may be issued upon completion of credit or non-credit courses typically delivered through continuing education for which there is a formal assessment of learning. The credit courses are taken from existing approved Saskatchewan Polytechnic credit programs.

Statement of Attendance:
 A statement of attendance may be issued upon completion of non-credit courses typically delivered through continuing education for which there is no formal assessment of learning.